Do you have a morning meditation routine?

Read 140 answers below or select another question.

Bedros Keuilian · Founder, CEO of Fit Body Boot Camp

I’ve tried meditation and I just can’t get into it. It’s not for me. I can’t sit still that long. The closest things I have are my workout and my gratitude exercise, which takes five minutes. It goes like this: I think about three things I’m grateful for this morning, as well as three people I’m grateful for, then I send a text message (or email) to those three people to let them know that I’m grateful for them and to thank them for being in my life.

Amanda Hesser · Co-Founder and CEO of Food52

When I have time, I meditate using Headspace. I know it’s sort of cheating, but I do it while lying in bed, which I find both meditative and relaxing. I always sleep well when I carve out the time to do this.

When I have less time or feel anxious, I use the app Unblock Me, which is a block puzzle game. I like that it involves visual problem solving. I do puzzles until I’ve completed one in a seamless fashion. Once that happens, I take a quit-while-you’re-ahead approach and turn it off so I can go to sleep feeling good about something I’ve done.

Merrill Stubbs · Co-Founder and President of Food52

If I meditate, it’s at night before bed. It’s pretty much impossible for me to steal a quiet moment to myself in the morning, unless, of course, I were to get up earlier. But then I’d have to go to bed earlier, and who wants to do that?

Christine Koh · Lifestyle Expert, Parent

I have tried meditating and am pretty bad at it, but I would like to get better someday! Meanwhile, yoga and running serve as my meditative practices.

With yoga, I typically hold each pose for eight breaths, so the breathing helps me focus. With running, there’s a similar thing I made up several years ago to help me get through long, hard runs. I take thirty breaths, focusing on each body part, starting with the feet and moving up to the ankles, calves, knees, quads, hams, butt, hips, abs, heart, and head, and then back down again. Sometimes it’s really hard to stay focused enough to get to thirty, so I have to start again at zero. The point is to try to calm down my brain and center myself enough to focus on those breaths. I also use this method when specific body parts are hurting (e.g., cramps) to try to bring intention to the area and work through the pain. I made this thirty-count breathing thing up, and it’s kind of like my running meditation!

Sahara Rose · Holistic and Ayurvedic Nutritionist

My meditations are my morning affirmations and intentions. I have a lot of Shakti feminine energy flow through me, so sitting down and forcing myself to think of nothing is basically torture. I love words, movement, creativity, and flow, and feel most meditative when I’m doing something that involves those things.

Terri Schneider · Endurance Athlete, Author

My first workout is my moving meditation. I use the time to consider my day, check in with my mind and notice my thoughts, and set myself up for what is coming in that day. When I practice sitting meditation, it’s later in the day.

Emily White · Co-Founder of Dreamfuel, Whitesmith Entertainment

I have a daily and constant meditation practice that is based in the mindful practices of vipassana.

I generally meditate for five minutes after waking up, for five minutes after working out, and in five-minute increments throughout the day - especially before focusing on certain projects or speaking engagements. I also meditate on the subway, and it generally adds up to at least 30-60 minutes of meditation a day. I wish I had a more lengthy regular meditation practice, but this is what currently works for my life and schedule.

Erin Loechner · Author, Parent

I start my morning with a simple prayer: Lord, help me see. That’s it. Nothing fancy. I find it offers me the precise amount of perspective I need throughout the day - I’m always repeating it in my head!

Guy Tal · Landscape and Nature Photographer

When outdoors I like taking an hour or more in the early morning as the light changes and life awakes to become intensely mindful of my surroundings and push all else out of my mind. When home I am not always as disciplined but I strive to practice zazen meditation for 15-30 minutes before starting my work day.

Erin Motz · Co-Founder of Bad Yogi

Yes, and it’s nothing special.

I sit on the floor with my eyes closed and let myself slip into the space between my thoughts. I don’t try to eliminate my thoughts, but I try to sit between them, as weird as that sounds. I use mantras but not the Sanskrit kind. I change them often and they evolve as the meditation goes, but they’re super simple. For example: “I am powerful.” “I’m seeking creative solutions.” “I’m open to all possibility.” They change all the time, and I just make them up according to what I need.

Steph Davis · Free Soloist, Wingsuit BASE Jumper

I have had years where I prioritized seated meditation, but I find that running gives me the best headspace. I usually come up with ideas for stories or work projects in the middle or near the end of my run, and my mood and energy levels are at their highest after running.

Jon Gold · Designer, Engineer, Adventurer

Yes! I find that meditation is the main, key habit for my having a good life. That sounds dramatic, but I absolutely mean it.

I primarily practice Vipassana mediation; occasionally I’ll practice Mettā meditation in the evening as well to change things up. I’ve had a variety of guided and unguided stints; currently I’m using Dan Harris’ wonderful 10% Happier app, which has excellent guided meditations from some of the best teachers around.

Two of the most influential meditation books for me were Dan Harris’s 10% Happier (surprise!) and Bhante Gunaratana’s Mindfulness in Plain English. I’d also recommend going on a retreat if want to take your practice further - ten-day silent retreats are daunting, but weekend retreats are convenient and super refreshing.

Gracy Obuchowicz · Yoga Teacher, Retreat Leader

I’ve studied a few kinds of meditation but none of them too seriously. Mostly, I just sit and notice and feel. I do alternate nostril breathing. My mind wanders and I bring it back. My practice isn’t fancy but seems to do the trick of keeping me centered.

Isabel De Los Rios · Certified Nutritionist

I have a morning prayer time routine, which is different than meditation in that I am actively talking to God. After I make my tea or coffee, I go right into whatever Bible reading I have set up for that morning and then spend some time in silent prayer.

I spend a good portion of that time thanking God for my family, my health, and my work, and then I give Him my intentions for the day.

David Kadavy · Author

I try to meditate for ten minutes each morning (sometimes I’ll extend it to half an hour). I guess it’s mindfulness meditation. I first concentrate on my breath, and then I search my body for points of tension that I allow myself to release.

Sonia Rao · Singer-Songwriter

I meditate for thirty minutes each morning and free-write for another thirty minutes. I’m not sure what type of meditation this is, but I just sit up against my headboard on my bed and focus on my breath. If my mind starts to drift to a thought, then I bring my attention back to my breath.

Mantras and guided meditations feel distracting to me, and I like the simplicity of focusing on my breath. I used to have trouble sticking to a meditation routine, but last year I did a one-week silent meditation retreat and it really changed me. I fell in love with meditation, so now, instead of meditation being something I have to do, it’s something I look forward to doing.

Tiffany Pham · Founder, CEO of Mogul

I do not meditate. I’m known to have a naturally calm temperament and I do not stress out very often. I always try to be over prepared for the moment, whatever it may be that I am trying to accomplish, so that I can maintain a kind and calm composure.

UJ Ramdas · Co-Founder, Intelligent Change

I practice a few rounds of pranayama and mostly focus on breath awareness. Breath awareness is really the foundation of my meditative practice.

Pranayama is basically controlled breathing exercises. It is essentially a yogic practice and the idea is that the length and quality of your breathing is directly related to your mental/emotional state. By regulating the breathing directly, you basically learn to influence your mental state.

Katelin Jabbari · Googler, Parent

I’ve never really gotten into meditation. Too much to think about, and too little time to do it. That probably means I’m the perfect candidate for it, but I just don’t think it’ll ever happen…

Taylor Davidson · Entrepreneur, Photographer

I’ve tried to make meditation a regular part of my mornings a couple times in my life, but now, with familial responsibilities, I find it hard to get up before my family to create the time for early morning meditation. Instead, that morning walk or run with my dog is how I create and clear the mental space for the day. Being outside, walking in a park, is my way to add mindfulness into my day.

Manuel Lima · Designer, Author

In the past, I tried doing a five-to-ten-minute meditation session every morning. I think it lasted for a couple of weeks, but then everything else got in the way. I would like to try it again, since it can have a great impact on mood and overall well-being.

Ann Handley · Author, CCO of MarketingProfs

My “meditation” is a little pocket of quiet I have every afternoon when I walk my beloved little dog in the woods near my house (thereby redeeming myself for her chronically late breakfasts).

Craig Ballantyne · Author, Fitness Expert

I started meditating on January 28th, 2013, and haven’t missed a day since. My average session lasts twenty minutes, and if possible, I time it with the sunrise and meditate on a few pillows in front of an east-facing window. On days where I have an early flight, I’ll meditate for at least five minutes during takeoff. It’s a perfect opportunity to lean back, relax, and breathe deeply. And if I’m lucky, I’ll fall asleep in that position for a quick snooze.

Dustin Senos · Designer and Engineer

I sometimes meditate in the morning. If there’s one thing I’m trying to improve about my mornings, it is to create a meditation habit. When I have had a consistent meditation practice I am at the top of my game.

For tracking my meditation, I like the app Calm.

David Moore · Designer

I do, and I’ve found it extremely helpful in the past few years. At the very least I have twenty minutes of silence in the morning. Usually, I like to take the time to use Headspace for a deeply focused meditation. My uncle gave me that tip as a child but of course, I was stubborn.

Now that I’m an adult this has proven to be an excellent way to jump start my mind and to begin to get the creative juices flowing. I’ve also found an incredible meditation/yoga group at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, and I invite everyone to visit.

Jake Kahana · Artist, Creative Director

On and off. It was a goal of mine last year to learn about meditation and start a practice. I don’t do it as regularly as I’d like but I usually do some kind of mindfulness meditation when I do. Create some intention and focus on that.

Steve Kamb · Founder of Nerd Fitness

Meditation is something I’ve flirted with off and on for years - I’ll go a month without meditating, and then go a month meditating for fifteen minutes every day. I’ve found the most success following the guided meditations in the Headspace app.

Cara Stawicki · Rower

No, but ideally I can focus my mind on the erg or the water to the point of attaining sort of flow, which to me is a form of meditation.

It’s hard though. It takes discipline. There’s always a lot going on at the boathouse and on the Schuylkill. It’s easy to get distracted. I noticed last year that distractions were really affecting my performance. I’ve had to learn to be less reactive, improve my focus, and discipline my mind.

Morgan Jaldon · Marathon Runner

Yes, I do light yoga stretching before I do my push-ups! Nothing too extravagant, just mainly concentrating on my breath and one good yoga flow. At least five simple minutes to gather my thoughts while getting a good stretch.

Maren Kate Donovan · Founder of Zirtual

I practice whatever I’m studying at the time, I’m still very new to meditation, so just getting fifteen minutes in is a win for me. I use Calm or find a mantra on YouTube and listen to it while meditating.

Rand Fishkin · Founder of Moz

I don’t, though I’d love to try. I think answering email is my meditation. If I can get through it before I leave for the office, I feel much more at peace.

Gregg Carey · Entrepreneur, Survivor Contestant

I used to meditate somewhat regularly, but I seem to get similar benefits from piano so it’s been reduced. These days, I say that I need to meditate more than I’m actually meditating.

When I meditate, I tend to use guided meditations with the Headspace or Calm apps. I often use my commute for meditation: I try to keep a quiet mind amidst the hectic subway.

Danielle Buonaiuto · Soprano

​I consider my few minutes of breathing a meditative process; my coffee on the train can be deeply meditative. I think meditation can take many forms.

Elizabeth Royal · Street Style, Fashion Photographer

I don’t meditate in the morning, though I do a quiet time or devotional each morning. It involves some reading and learning and a whole lot of praying. Praying, I guess, is kind of the closest thing I do to meditating. Praying humbles me and reminds me every day that there are things beyond myself out there.

Johnny FD · Entrepreneur, Frequent Traveler

I usually only meditate at night, but my entire morning ritual is a type of meditation.

From using a hand grinder to prepare my coffee beans, to doing yoga and stretches in the sun, and even walking to the office; I’m extremely present during each activity. I learned this while doing a ten day silent meditation in Thailand that included something called walking meditation, which just involved being present in whatever you’re doing at the time.

Wesley Verhoeve · Photographer

The meditation part of my morning routine is only about six months old and happened when I found the Headspace app, which finally allowed me to get started on a habit that I’ve wanted to develop for years.

I’ve really enjoyed it, even though it’s not necessarily always easy. Sometimes I fall of the wagon for a few days at a time. The longest consecutive run I had was 54 days in a row, and then I overslept on day 55, planned to do it at night, and forgot.

Louisa Rogers · Business Trainer, Writer

In Mexico, three or four times a week I leave home at 7:40am and walk through el centro to our zen meditation group, about six minutes away. It’s led by an old, somewhat cranky Japanese master and held in the dance studio of one of the university buildings. We sit in silence for two periods of 25 minutes each.

I am loosely part of a meditation group in Eureka, too, but I’m more faithful to the Mexico group because the timing, format, and location work for me so well.

Molli Surowiec · SoulCycle Instructor, Former Professional Dancer

Meditation, in it’s essence, for me, is practising giving our full attention. In the morning, it’s about connecting with my body, clearing my mind, and focusing on the very act that keeps us alive: our breathing. In practising giving our full attention to our breath, we’re able to get out of our heads and be more present for our day and our loved ones.

Carrie Melissa Jones · Writer, Community Builder

Making tea is my meditation.

I met Sharon Salzberg last year at a community event I planned on meditation in the workplace. She is the woman who brought Buddhism to America in the 1970s. I recall her talking about turning teatime into meditation time, really staying present for the process, so I try to do that. I don’t take myself too seriously in this regard.

Temitopé Owolabi · Photographer, Student

I conventionally would show gratitude for another chance at life. Because I feel every morning you wake up, you’re favored and granted another opportunity to live and fulfil your purposes.

Andre D. Wagner · Photographer

Waking up in a clean apartment, beautiful light shining through my windows, and Miles Davis playing is my mediation.

I consider my thoughts and morning writing in my journal mediation. I don’t practice traditional meditation. For me, meditation happens in the mind… all of the time.

Aiste Gazdar · Co-Founder, Director of Wild Food Cafe

My morning meditation is probably the most important aspect of each day. I see it as ‘making your bed’ for the day - whatever external or internal struggles I might have, meditation is the opportunity to iron things out from the other side of conscious awareness. Without any thinking or doing - just by becoming super aware of the vastness, depth, and richness of my being. Once in that state, everything falls in the right place, even if I don’t yet know what those things are.

Honestly, I could really do with more meditation. Currently I do about 15-20 minutes in the morning, and the same in the evening.

Tammy Strobel · Writer, Photographer

I don’t have a formal whole morning meditation practice. I consider journaling a form of meditation (at least for me). Journaling daily clears my mind and helps me stay emotionally healthy and positive. Without my daily journaling practice, I think I’d go crazy.

I am a huge fan of Oprah and Deepak’s meditation programs. I’ve purchased a few of their programs and will listen to the meditations on morning walks or in the afternoon. I don’t structure formal meditation time into my schedule, though.

Hua Wang · Entrepreneur, Aspiring Cook

Transcendental meditation allows me to quiet my mind and feel healthier and happier. I am calmer and more patient, and better prepared to tackle the day’s challenges.

I’m a big believer in meditation, as it has been scientifically proven to reduce cortisol levels, lower risk of a heart attack and improve brain function. My morning meditation is only ten minutes long, because that seems to be the ideal amount of time for me to get the benefits from meditation and the length of time my mind can really focus on the moment.

Ivanka Trump · Real Estate Executive, Parent

Meditation is one of the most important things I do each day.

I meditate for twenty minutes, ideally twice daily. Sometimes I miss the afternoon session, but I always make the morning one. It’s been invaluable in terms of calming my mind and allowing me to think more clearly. I recently treated my team to an intensive transcendental meditation course. It’s proven to increase productivity at work and cut down on stress (doesn’t that sound awesome!?). We covered my team’s experience with transcendental meditation on my site.

Melody Wilding · Licensed Therapist, Expert in Workplace Psychology

Morning workouts are meditative for me. It frees up my subconscious. Some of my best thinking happens when I let my mind relax and wander.

There are so many benefits to mindfulness, so I make a point to search for reflective time throughout my day, even if it’s in small ways. If I’m stuck on a long line or delayed on the subway, rather than be annoyed, I see it as an opportunity to reflect and practice being present and in the now.

Mike Vardy · Founder of Productivityist

I’m trying meditation more these days, but not in the morning. I think I’d probably fall back asleep if I did it then!

I actually think the reading in the morning acts as a mild form of reflection and preparation, so it may do for me at that time of day what meditation does for others.

Jenny Blake · Author, Yoga Fanatic

Yes, meditation is my medicine! It is the best thing I can do for my day, and it helps me feel calm, grounded, strategic, and creative.

In 2013 I co-founded a meditation app, Lucent, to help people who were meditation-curious learn how to sit for even just five minutes a day. You can check-out our free 5-Day Kickstart Course here.

Elle Luna · Artist, Designer, Writer

My sense is that my whole morning feels like a meditation. I try to be present to each aspect of the morning routine. There’s a lovely story that I heard once that I love:

One day the Buddha was speaking to a prince. The prince asked him, “What do you and your monks do in your monastery?” The Buddha said, “We sit and we walk and we eat.” The prince replied, “How are you different, then, from my people, for we do those things as well?” The Buddha responded, “When we sit, we know we are sitting. When we walk, we know we are walking. When we eat, we know we are eating.”

Amber Rae · Writer, Artist

I see meditation as any activity that either a) quiets the mind, or b) allows you to access source.

For example, when my fiancé cooks, he is in total meditation non-thinker mode. When I write, I’m in full-on channeling mode. I don’t think we need to be cross-legged on a pillow to meditate. I have to say though, I’ve really been digging the Headspace app for a daily dose of calm.

Eli Trier · Illustrator, Writer

I do occasionally meditate in the mornings, though I prefer to do it in the evenings before bed. I love Susan Piver’s guided mindfulness meditations – she has such a lovely soothing voice.

Chris Baker · Art Dealer, Runs Nutritional Company

I’ve tried all sorts of meditation, and I usually just get more annoyed and frustrated after sitting with my legs crossed for twenty minutes after doing it.

Again it is finding what works for you. I always make the last 10-15 minutes of my workout the most focused and hardest. As I finish the workout, I go and find a quiet spot in the gym and lie on my back and close my eyes.

I did a deprivation tank about four months ago in San Francisco. And the one thing I noticed was just how much energy our bodies produce. I got a real sense of connection with my energy levels, and how I felt like a steam train that was constantly on the go. So I pay close attention to this. I then just go through all the things I am truly grateful for in my life. It is so easy to want more and increase the speed and size of your life, but if you’re not content with what you have, you will never be content by what you add. This is my form of meditation.

Shannon Whitehead · Founder of Factory45

I meditate, but never in the morning because I’ll fall back asleep.

I save meditation either for savasana at the end of yoga class, in the middle of the day when my brain needs a break, or at night if I can’t fall asleep.

Nichole Powell · Photographer, Writer

I don’t meditate per say, but I love nothing more than being able to sit and enjoy my coffee and breakfast in total silence. I don’t need a book or anything; I just like to be present and have time to think. I suppose some people would call that meditation, but it’s not deliberate.

Oleksandr Kosovan · Founder, CEO of MacPaw

I used to practice autosuggestion, and I’m still planning to learn some techniques and make them a part of my everyday routine. The mind is a powerful thing when you can control it.

Courtney Boyd Myers · Founder, Audience.io

If I’m crashing in Los Angeles, or living with my housemates on Powder Mountain, I love waking up and meditating with friends. Otherwise, I’ll meditate first thing in the morning in my bed or after a workout on my own.

Tessa Miller · Tech and Health Editor, The Daily Beast

I like to meditate at night. I’m pretty rushed in the mornings, and I don’t like to set a time limit on meditating. It helps me wind down before sleeping too, so I’m not awake for hours worrying about mindless stuff.

Rae Dunn · Ceramic Artist

I don’t have the typical meditation session, but playing the piano clears my head and puts me in the flow. Also, my work as a ceramic artist is very meditative in itself, so I feel like meditation is happening throughout my day.

Dan Counsell · Parent, Founder of Realmac Software

Not yet, but it’s something I’d like to start doing.

I recently signed up with Headspace to help get me started and have been doing it in the afternoon a few times a week.

I’ve found that the process of disconnecting from technology for a bit can have a really positive impact, so much so that we recently started a weekly no-technology day at home. We do it every Saturday and it’s amazing.

Mars Dorian · Online Illustrator, Indie Sci-Fi Author

I tried to meditate because I like Jedis, but it didn’t work out for me. My mind is a creative tornado, and I’d like to keep it that way. This just proves not everything works for everyone.

Drawing and writing are my meditations ;)

Jordan Bishop · Canadian Entrepreneur

A twenty-minute meditation is the first thing I do every day. As soon as I wake up - before peeing, before even leaving my bed - I start into twenty minutes of meditation. Sometimes my mind wanders a lot, and I allow it; those twenty minutes are a time when I solve problems before my mind has been tainted by the events of the day.

Paula Borowska · Author, Blogger, UX Designer

I love the idea of meditation and I tried to practice it when I graduated college because I was stressed. I think it’s a fantastic method to get ones mind right, but I never seem to remember to do it.

Mike Moloney · Entrepreneur, Web Designer

As far as meditation I usually like to think and review my daily, monthly, and yearly goals. Not sure if this is considered full meditation, but it helps get keep me focused and accountable for what I want to achieve.

Gray Miller · Grandparent, Writer, Speaker

Soto zen meditation, as I understand it and practice it, is basically just sitting there. No chanting, no visualizations or affirmations, just SIT THERE. Of course, the brain goes to various places – the “monkey mind” likes to play – but the idea is to just continually bring it back to here. Now.

I’ve taken to really enjoying that brief part of the day where my job is to just sit quietly. I think of it as gathering silence, of collecting a reservoir of peace that I can draw on as needed during the turmoil of the day.

Melissa Fergusson · Parent, Creative director, Actor

Having attended many meditation workshops, this form of ‘calm’ has not entered into my morning routine as yet.

I tend to do self affirmations and speak to the universe in the shower daily, opposed to traditional meditation. I absolutely love the process though!

Candace Bryan · Editor, Azula.com

On days where I have a lot to do, or am generally stressed, I’ll say to myself over and over again “I’m going to make today my bitch!” It’s not classy, but it works.

Instead of wasting time lamenting that I have to answer 100 emails, I say “I’m going to make today my bitch! I’m going to make these emails my bitch!” and I’ll be done in 40 minutes.

Ruchika Batra · Lifestyle Coach, Yoga Teacher

I like to do my meditation in my bathroom. It feels very sacred to me, my meditation routine includes listening to a mantra and letting it soak into my cells, or just breathing with my eyes open.

Carrie Ford Hilliker · Designer, Brand Strategist

Before I actually get out of bed, I will do a very quick little touch-base moment with myself. A deep breath, a little reconnection to my internal stuff.

I’ve been a regular meditator for many years, but I don’t have a specific time or place that I sit. Since my days are so different from one to the next, I find it’s easier and more effective for me to tuck meditation into little pockets of my day.

Richard Wotton · Newly Qualified Media Studies Teacher

I have ten to fifteen minutes of private reflection when I wake up. It’s more soothing than when I go to bed, where my mind it still analysing the day’s events.

There is also a moment when I walk from the bus stop through the park that my school is located in that I start to feel good about the day ahead. It’s sound naive, but I do like the optimism that an early morning brings.

Hanny Kusumawati · Non-Profit Co-Founder

Yes, I have been practising my morning meditation for about a month.

On my free days, my morning meditation will follow my morning coffee. I like to meditate on long-haul flights, too. The benefit of having short legs is that I can sit cross-legged on my seat without nudging the person who sits beside me.

Pei Zhenah · Sketches, Works from Temples

For morning meditations I do a combination of both Taoist and Buddhist styles.

The Taoist method usually has many health benefits, one of which is called six healing sounds. The Buddhist method trains you in mindfulness and clarity, and I particularly love the Korean zen methods.

Emma Milligen · Animator, Art Geek, Vegan

Y’know, I’ve tried to incorporate this into my routine, but I always feel like a newb. I’d love to get meditation (as well as yoga) in to my routine though, as my deck seems to be absolutely perfect for it in the summer months.

Previously when trying to incorporate it in to my mornings, I actually found it hard not to fall back asleep… so I think I’m doing something wrong there! But I do love meditation from what I’ve tried of it, and it is something I have always wanted to get back into my life on a regular basis.

Mark Kennedy · Parent, Former Kinesiologist

A few years ago I had a regular meditation routine using a guided meditation on my iPhone. It helped me manage anxiety and calm my mind immensely.

I wouldn’t necessarily call it mediation, but now I take twenty deep controlled breaths in the shower each day to calm my mind and start the day off on the right track.

Julian Summerhayes · Parent, Speaker, Former Lawyer

At the beginning of the year I went to a number of Zen Buddhism classes nearby in Devon. I had wanted to study mindfulness but as soon as I started to read what the evening meditation was all about, I knew I had to attend.

I went for a couple of months, but due to working away a fair bit at the moment I haven’t been able to go as much I would have liked. However, I have kept up with my morning meditation of about 15-25 minutes. Apart from anything else, I know that it’s a way of me finding peace and it helps with my focus on a whole series of things. It’s just the start, and I intend to go much deeper with my study of Zen.

Krista Goral · IT Consultant, Writer

Not formally, though I do practice auto-suggestion as part of my writing. It is a sort of mental clearing and refocusing; it centres me for the rest of the day, which is an important part of a meditation practice.

Richard Boehmcke · Writer, Stage Director

I don’t do it. I know I should, I want to. I just haven’t made time for it yet. I’m an always-on-mind-always-racing type of person. I’d love to incorporate some meditation, it just hasn’t happened yet.

Sarah Kathleen Peck · Writer, Designer, Long-Distance Swimmer

I love morning meditations. I have a few that I like to do. Sometimes I get out of bed, turn on some quiet music, leave the lights off, and do a “dance wiggle” for a few minutes in the morning. It’s like a lions stretch, a toe touch, and then some loosening up of the cobwebs in my shoulder creases and legs. I love to dance and use my body, so starting the day this way brings a smile to my face.

On my more tired, reflective, or contemplative days, I’ll go sit on my yoga mat under the window for a few minutes with my eyes closed, treasuring the space in my mind quiet.

My third favorite meditation is probably taking a short walk – even just a 20-minute jaunt. On days when my brain is frozen or I feel a bit paralyzed by the hundred-thousand tasks I feel like I have to do, I take time to move through space and breathe in order to help shake and sort out the priorities and discover what’s urgent versus what can wait.

Matt Cheuvront · Marathon Runner, Entrepreneur, Writer

I wish. This is something I need to be much more deliberate about. My hustle is a bit of a blessing and a curse. I work hard, and I’m a productivity guru, but I need to work on shutting it off and shutting down, especially early in the day.

Kit Johnson · Writer, Photographer, Reiki Enthusiast

You know, I forgot to tell you about one of the most important parts of my morning routine because it’s so routine that I don’t even think about it.

It’s not meditation, but Reiki. I first learned it while backpacking in New Zealand, and ever since then I have given myself Reiki at the start of every day, before even moving out of bed. It’s more important to me than breakfast, and that’s saying quite a bit.

Sarah Athanas · Marketing Creative, Documentary Filmmaker

For a zen student, this is the most essential part of the routine, no question. I have a corner in my apartment with an alter and cushion, and I light a candle and incense every morning. I also maintain a vase with cut flowers. It is very important to create and care for a sacred space if you want to have a regular meditation practice.

I read a short poem or gatha before sitting and chant the bodhisattva vows afterwards, followed by three full bows. In addition to having an incredible grounding effect, this practice is a constant reminder that this life is about much more than me.

Amit Sonawane · Reader, Writer, Devout Tea Drinker

This is something I’ve gone back and forth on for a while now. Finally, I have settled on the idea of being in a meditative state of mind while I carry out my morning routine. Meditating is an act of simply being aware. I tend to do that when I am making a fresh pot of coffee (the smell, the feel of cold water as I wash the pot, the gentle warm steam on my face as I bring the cup closer for a sip, etc), or while reading or taking a walk.

I have realized that I don’t have to be physically sitting down to meditate. Many times we begin meditation and make our body still, but the mind is still racing. Ideally, you want to have both mind and body still, but if you’re busy like me, I’d make the mind a priority over the body when it comes to meditation.

Will Peach · Writer, Frequent Traveler

I’ve tried it in bursts but never really found it appealing enough to stick to. I started, about a month ago, just practising free writing for 25-minutes, pouring whatever is in my head out into a text file. That seems to serve as good meditation, it makes me feel like I’ve already accomplished something that day and it helps to organize thoughts and priorities.

Andrew · Early Riser, Australian Francophile

In terms of meditation, on my travels this year I was interested so I stopped in to visit a few gurus along the way in India. Me personally, I found it a bit silly. Staring at a spot on the wall for an hour or so. A friend then recommended an app on the iPhone called Headspace, which I can honestly say is fantastic.

I don’t really meditate in the traditional sense in the morning, but when the river is calm and the sun’s coming up, taking a bit of time out to be quiet and breathe properly might count for something.